Topic: Sweet Release

Even though its Reese's album I think OK for General Topics considering Joe produced it.
We received a gift copy on the cruise and got the special show with some of the artists on the album including Joe, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Josh Smith, Chris Layton, Noah Hunt, Paulie Cerra and Jimmy Hall, Juanita Tippins, as well as other guests. It was a great show and Reese was so happy. More importantly though its a great album
I have only listened to it once so far but enjoyed it through and through.
I would have preordered but since ship date was when I was on vaca, I am glad I waited as I got it on the ship.
Thanks Reese!!!
Crossfire is def one of my top SRV songs...thrilled to have this version...looks like Reese and others wrote it...glad to know that..

Re: Sweet Release

I got a chance to stream it over the weekend. It’s a top notch covers cd.All the musicians do a standout job. Made me wonder if Reese ever did any songwriting?
Probably not or there would’ve something in the album.

Your rock candy baby
Your hard sweet and sticky

Re: Sweet Release

he definitely co-wrote Crossfire
and prob others but looks like thats the only one on this cd
its a good insert and he explains some of the song choices and ones he played when in various bands etc
(no lyrics though :;) )

Re: Sweet Release

When I heard Reese was doing his "own" album I went yeah,,
Then I saw the song list,  I went oh... he's not doing his songs, he's rehashing all the old songs he played for others.

I'll eventually give it a listen since there are such great musicians on it.

Would have like to see him on his "own"

---------------

(If only I had 1% of Joe's guitar talent)

Re: Sweet Release

maybe we will next?

I found this that gives a bit of the background
https://shop.jbonamassa.com/products/re … gI2GPD_BwE

(Nashville, TN) January 9, 2019: Rock & Roll Hall of Fame member and world-renowned Nashville-based keyboardist Reese Wynans announces his first-ever solo album Sweet Release, a collection of songs honoring a paramount selection of blues-rock legends. The long anticipated album comes following a career that’s spanned over 50 years and literally hundreds of historical collaborations. Sweet Release also serves as Joe Bonamassa’s inaugural credit as a producer. Bonamassa has long been a fan of Wynans’ work, urging him to create a solo album and championing the project as producer.

The fact is Reese Wynans is everywhere. For a full half-century, Wynans has been the engine-room behind America’s greatest roots music. With Sweet Release, this modest legend has delivered the long-awaited solo album that puts his own name top of the bill and places his world-class talent in the spotlight. “I’ve never had an album out with my name on it before,” he considers, “so I’m very excited. I’d like this record to make people feel happy and celebrate the music. Because that’s what we were doing…”

“Reese inspires me every day,” Bonamassa professes. “He encouraged me and was the heart and soul of the entire session. All the guest artists performed brilliantly and totally brought their best stuff from the very down beat. It was not lost on Reese nor me how blessed we were to work with such talent. All I know is what I know ... I love the man... He is as gracious and a gentleman as he is talented and an icon.”

Scan the history books and he’s there on every page:  a vital strand of rock ‘n’ roll DNA, present at a thousand cultural flashpoints. Over the last five decades, you might have found him cutting his teeth with the early nucleus of the Allman Brothers Band or taking the stage with Boz Scaggs. Maybe you remember him bringing on the rise of Outlaw Country in Austin with Jerry Jeff Walker or saving the ’80s blues scene with Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame inductees Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble or most recently bringing his blues to the people with Joe Bonamassa. Adding his thumbprint on piano and B3, Reese has worked with the likes of Larry Carlton, Delbert McClinton, Los Lonely Boys, Joe Ely, Doug Sahm, Brooks & Dunn, Trisha Yearwood, Martina McBride, Hank Williams Jr., Buddy Guy – and many more. Not to mention, his roughly 500 live shows with Willie Nelson, unforgettable performance with Captain Beyond for the Sufficiently Breathless record, and three albums with Carole King.

“These songs are windows back into different eras and different times of my career,” explains Wynans. “It’s a collection of the songs I’ve played with musicians in the past, and it shines a light on blues artists that I think need a little bit more recognition.”

In the late-’60s, Wynans was playing alongside future blues-rock royalty in Florida up-and-comers, the Second Coming. “Dickey Betts was one of our guitar players and our bass player was Berry Oakley,” he says. “Duane Allman was in Muscle Shoals at the time and would come down on a weekend and sit in with us. For Sweet Release, we covered the old Les Dudek song, “Take The Time”, which reminds me of being back in Jacksonville during the dawn of that Southern rock era.”

Other songs salute the ’70s, when the keys man could be found flanking Boz Scaggs as the rising songwriter established his reputation on the West Coast. For Wynans, “Sweet Release” of Scaggs’ acclaimed catalogue shone brightest, and decades later, it gives Sweet Release its title track.

Of course, the Sweet Release tracklisting wouldn’t be complete without a nod to the great Stevie Ray Vaughan. In 1985, Wynans’ world changed forever when the iconic Texas bluesman drafted him into the Double Trouble band for the era-defining Soul To Soul and In Step albums. “It was unbelievable to play on a stage with those guys,” he remembers. “I have to tell you that I hardly ever heard Stevie play a bad note. He was on his game every single night. The Stevie songs on Sweet Release – “Crossfire”, “Say What!”, “Riviera Paradise” and “Hard To Be” – are our tribute to him.”

In 1990, SRV’s tragic death robbed the blues world of an all-time great and Wynans of a cherished friend. But the keys man bravely brushed himself off and walked on, soon becoming one of Nashville’s most in-demand players with credits for headline acts including Lee Roy Parnell, Brooks & Dunn and Hank Williams Jr.

In 2015, the seed of a solo album was planted when post-millennial blues master Joe Bonamassa called up with a tantalizing offer. “He wanted to do a series of shows at Red Rocks where we would feature the music of Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters,” says Wynans. “And y’know, that’s right up my alley. So things went on from there.”

Now, Sweet Release feels like a musician coming home. Wynans was already a familiar face at Ocean Way: the Nashville studio where he’d previously added fairy-dust to endless tracks for other artists. And when sessions began for his own solo album, it was a joy to reconnect with the Double Trouble rhythm section of Tommy Shannon (bass) and Chris Layton (drums) – plus modern guitar great Kenny Wayne Shepherd. Meanwhile, Bonamassa lent his own famed guitar skills to SRV moments like “Riviera Paradise”.

To celebrate the announcement, the first single “Crossfire”, a tribute to the legacy of Stevie Ray Vaughan and Wynans’ work with Double Trouble, is available today as a free song download on Reese and Joe’s websites (reesewynans.com and jbonamassa.com respectively) and it features the iconic Sam Moore of Sam & Dave on vocals. “Playing music with Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble for five years was an outrageous experience. I loved every minute of it,” shares Wynans. “It was a real treat getting to play a couple of our old songs with Tommy Shannon and Chris Layton. When we were writing this, someone said it reminded them of a Sam & Dave groove. Joe suggested we ask Sam Moore to sing it.”

Throughout his celebrated career, the one omission on Wynans’ résumé was that this fabled keys man had never released a solo record – until now. Sweet Release is a glorious collision of stellar musicianship, classic material given fresh mojo, and a glittering roll-call of star guests that confirms the deep respect Wynans commands on the scene.

Re: Sweet Release

DougH wrote:

When I heard Reese was doing his "own" album I went yeah,,
Then I saw the song list,  I went oh... he's not doing his songs, he's rehashing all the old songs he played for others.

I'll eventually give it a listen since there are such great musicians on it.

Would have like to see him on his "own"

I am with you on it. Would have liked new music versus covers.Some of the covers offer up is a different take on the original.Thats when I like a cover.The  ones that stay true to  the original I feel better served in a live setting rather than on a studio album. The big plus for me is that the songs are done really well .
  The minus is I dont know how many times I would listen to it before I put it on the shelf. New music for me has a longer time in the rotation before it gets stale.

Your rock candy baby
Your hard sweet and sticky

Re: Sweet Release

I rarely post here, but the old argument of covers as substandard to the original is something I have a hard time agreeing with.
Sometimes a new version breathes fresh air to those golden oldies.  The thing about this album is JB held back from the pitfalls of over-production.  He assembled legends in their own right and captured lightning in a bottle.  I highly recommend a careful listen of Sweet Release.  Reese is such a genius and this album doesn't disappoint.

Re: Sweet Release

Just to be clear from my standpoint.This album of covers in my opinion is not substandard in any way.A lot of covers albums  are of the highest quality. On this album I would say there are several that are not exact copies of the originals or popular versions. That’s what I like.
Some are very close to what I have already heard before. Like Crossfire . Doesn’t seem much different than SRV. . I will not be playing it more than 2 or three times before I will get bored with it.Because that song was played  so much on the radio how many times am I going to play it as a cover of it is close to the original? Not too much. Now take the song Soul Island.I am not familiar with that song and love it and will play that a lot.
So for me I Rarely see a covers album as substandard.It is more if it is too close to the original and I have heard the song too may times before ,I probably won’t be giving it my time for repeated listens.
  Back in the not to distant past Joe’s albums where mostly covers.Most of them were either different from what I had heard or a song I was not familiar with.Therefore, the fact they were covers was a non issue.
   Walter Trout’s new album is covers.His concept was not to play the same ol same covers that are done a million times over.
  That’s an example of what I feel is the best way to go.If your at a concert and the band does a cover it is usually great live. It’s another thing to play it over and over and over as you have done so  with the original.Unless it is really different such as an example of Van Halen’s You Really Got Me which is a lot different than the Kinks in sound.
  So for me.For my listening it’s a mixed bag.Great But I don’t see myself playing it for a long time.I have already played  it a couple times and not finding myself wanting to go back to it again right away.
Again.Nothing negative about it.I am not an expert on producing but it seems to me Joe has done a great job with the album an it sounds great.This is one I would keep in my back pocket so to speak for some future  listens at times.
  So this is just my listening preferences rather than any knock on the album.
I think it is outstanding.

Your rock candy baby
Your hard sweet and sticky

9 (edited by Curby 2019-03-09 22:00:10)

Re: Sweet Release

Some great observations Gary.  "Crossfire" and "Riviera Paradise" probably won't get played much cause I"m so attached to the originals.  The rest of the songs though are pretty darn good.  Hearing a keyboardist like Reese Wynans is the candy I'm craving on this one.  I'm also a big fan of Mike Farris and "Sweet Release" is my favorite song on the album.  Gotta give props to the Beatles instrumental too.

Re: Sweet Release

Crossfire LIVE - official video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPRtCKT … r_embedded

Re: Sweet Release

Amazing album. Evey song is a gem and a small beautiful world of it's own. But the one track that is truly stands out and absolutely special, unique and beautiful ( made me stop breathing and then cry ) is RIVIERA PARADISE. My favorite track on this brilliant album.    Also love Shape I'm In - so awesome and sounds so modern, That Driving Beat - great saxophone by Paulie Cerra, predictably So Much Trouble - I so wish Joe and Reese could play it live sometimes this year, love this song  and Joe's singing is great and expressive. Soul Island is beautiful. And Blackbird - magical. And also so different and wonderful I've Got A Right To Be Blue - soulful and gritty, Keb Mo is so good.
  Thank you Reese Wynans for a great album!

12 (edited by BansheeUK 2019-03-18 06:55:08)

Re: Sweet Release

Curby wrote:

Some great observations Gary.  "Crossfire" and "Riviera Paradise" probably won't get played much cause I"m so attached to the originals.  The rest of the songs though are pretty darn good.  Hearing a keyboardist like Reese Wynans is the candy I'm craving on this one.  I'm also a big fan of Mike Farris and "Sweet Release" is my favorite song on the album.  Gotta give props to the Beatles instrumental too.

Mike Farris is swinging by my new, favourite venue, mid-June. Announced on Friday 15th,  and virtually sold-out already.... Silver & Stone (latest album) on the shopping list...

All those who believe in psychokenesis raise my hand........

Re: Sweet Release

i wanted to comment on the old songs / new songs thing...for me...I never used to own much music...and before becoming a Joe fan and collecting more, I really only knew what was played on the radio for the most part.
And Joe introduced me to so much esp. blues, as well as other friends here...so with Sweet Release, its mostly new music to me anyway and also inspired me to check out the older versions.

Re: Sweet Release

just discovered (or rediscovered, i am not sure) Reese's website - good stuff to check out there
need some Flying Piano tshirts!!!

http://reesewynans.com/?fbclid=IwAR0NgE … 9mtEhRTBkQ

Re: Sweet Release

Exclusive Interview with Reese Wynans and Sam Moore https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufCU8RVJRm8

Re: Sweet Release

I really have mixed feelings about this CD. The part I really love is that Reese plays much more on the songs and I don't think there's a better blues keyboards guy on earth that could do what he does.

On the other hand I was listening to those albums on cassette tapes until I wore them out so almost all of those songs are burned into my brain and even with songs like 'Crossfire' I wand to hear more of that syncopated singing that SRV did instead of the smoother version that is on the album.

The other part I have a problem with is that the recording has that 'compressed' feel that so many albums have today. The iTunes 'stank' on them. With the originals it almost sounded live. This sounds 'produced', flattened, compressed and pretty much nobody stands out. Just my two cents. I guess I have the originals so burned into my brain I just can't get my head around the changes I hear.

Blackbird on the other hand... great googldy-moogldy..... is absolutely amazing. That he hears those alternate melodies in his head is astounding. The guy is a great musician and of course I wish him all the success in the world. Not sure I can get entirely on board with this album just yet.